In Africa, Execution Rules Over Competition Because the Problems Remain There and Unsolved

In Africa, Execution Rules Over Competition Because the Problems Remain There and Unsolved

In the US, we earn around 10% of television screen time and less than that of mobile screen time. In 2 other countries, we earn a lower percentage of screen time due to lower penetration of our service. We earn consumer screen time, both mobile and television, away from a very broad set of competitors. We compete with (and lose to) Fortnite more than HBO. When YouTube went down globally for a few minutes in October, our viewing and signups spiked for that time. Hulu is small compared to YouTube for viewing time, and they are successful in the US, but non-existent in Canada, which creates a comparison point: our penetration in the two countries is pretty similar. There are thousands of competitors in this highly-fragmented market vying to entertain consumers and low barriers to entry for those with great experiences. Our growth is based on how good our experience is, compared to all the other screen time experiences from which consumers choose. Our focus is not on Disney+, Amazon or others, but on how we can improve our experience for our members.

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings

So, as a founder, give yourself a break and focus on the real business: building great products and a fantastic company. Do not allow another new fund-raise by a perceived competitor to stress you. Do not allow another new city expansion by the same competitor to stress you.

But worry if you are not serving your customers and improving your products. Many African startups do not die of competition, they die due to lack of execution.

Execution rules over competition because the problems remain there and unsolved. Continue reading here.

Founders, Competition is Not Your Problem; Execution Is.

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