MySpace Backup Problem Explains Why Competition Is NOT Your Startup Main Enemy

MySpace Backup Problem Explains Why Competition Is NOT Your Startup Main Enemy

“As a result of a server migration project, any photos, videos, and audio files you uploaded more than three years ago may no longer be available on or from Myspace. We apologize for the inconvenience.” Myspace.

That reminds me of a story in the Art of Electronics by Paul Horowitz and Winfield Hill, where the authors noted that one company made an electronic product, which became a hit in the market. But when it wanted to upgrade the design, it could not find the original schematic designs. The end-game? Bankruptcy.

As an undergraduate student in FUTO, that narration never left me, even when I had the opportunity to work on the design of a generation iPhone inertial sensors. This blog – tekedia- is backed up in real-time. Sure, traffic can cause troubles, sometimes, but data is never compromised.

Yes – imagine it: MySpace has no reasonable backup strategy. That was the company that was there before Facebook. People said Facebook won the competition. Not true- MySpace might have just died, even without Facebook, because it has no reason to be alive.

It’s not as if the internet needed another cautionary tale about backing up data, but for many artists, this news is heartbreaking nonetheless. Myspace has issued a tersely worded message noting that a huge amount of user-uploaded music has been lost during a server migration.

The once-dominant social network posted a note on its site reading, “As a result of a server migration project, any photos, videos, and audio files you uploaded more than three years ago may no longer be available on or from Myspace. We apologize for the inconvenience.”

Users have been reporting issues with music uploaded between 2003 and 2015 for around a year now. We’ve reached out to Myspace for additional insight into the issue — and whether what could well be millions of tracks are indeed permanently lost in the digital ether. Honestly though, things don’t look too good for Myspace or music uploaders.

As you do your thing – most times, competition does not destroy startups, startups just fail to live – yes, they just kill themselves. It is like that sound by the Fugees with lyrics “killing me softly”; I always jokingly note – it is still a kill even though it is softly! I get it (emotions).

Competition is not your main enemy as you build that startup. Your main enemies are the internal elements in your company which could affect flawless execution. Do not fret morning and night about competition because ideally for a Nigerian startup, you do not have many competitors!

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