What Does The Future Look Like For Non-Motorola Android Handsets?

When Google bought Motorola, the future for non-Google-owned Android handset manufacturers looked somewhat dim, predictably because Motorola would now have a direct interface with Android’s parent company and could therefore get access to more integrated links between hardware and operating system, potentially opening up a divide between Motorola handsets and those made by HTC, LG and other companies. If you’re looking to upgrade your O2 handset in the next year, you might see a significant difference in Motorola’s Android popularity.

 

Suspiciously, their statements were all the same. Let’s take a closer look:

 

“We welcome today’s news, which demonstrates Google’s deep commitment to defending Android, its partners, and the ecosystem.” – J.K. Shin, President of Samsung’s Mobile Communications Division.

 

“I welcome Google‘s commitment to defending Android and its partners.” – Bert Nordberg, President and CEO, Sony Ericsson.

 

“We welcome the news of today‘s acquisition, which demonstrates that Google is deeply committed to defending Android, its partners, and the entire ecosystem.” – Peter Chou, CEO, HTC Corp.

 

Notice something of a pattern? “Defending Android” comes up quite a lot, and that’s probably because it’s the same information they were all given by Google, to ensure that they presented a united front, rather than the reality, which would’ve resulted in Shin, Nordberg and Chou giving a somewhat more sombre quote.

 

If other iOS devices were released, they would never perform as well as the ones made by Apple, and the same could soon apply to Android and Motorola handsets. So if you’re thinking about what phone to buy as an Android user, it might be worth taking a look at Motorola’s lineup over the coming year, as you will more than likely see them become the primary Android platform.

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