Thank You For The Kind Words

Thank You For The Kind Words

Good people, thank you for your kind words on my last LinkedIn post (here on Tekedia). Largely, I had not expected it would inspire many as it has done. Over the last few hours, parents have been sending me contacts to drop lines to their children!

Within hours, it has been viewed by 240k people

Except my village which I love, and where kids would line up to meet whenever I visit home, I have not done really anything for the generous remarks.

London-based Planet Earth recognized Ndubuisi Ekekwe in tech

Nonetheless, my hope is that some of us ahead in the ladder would expand the base for others to climb. That is why I started posting since last year.

Yet, in the league of impacts, I’m a baby. There are African legends around the world, doing awesome things. But many are on employment structures which make it impossible to share here. But they abound.

People do ask me: “what is your greatest career accomplishment?” My response has been “The ability to control ownership of things I create”. It inspires me to know I’m building wealth over cash bonus!

Last week, a Nigerian senator called … “I read that the U.S. government licensed your patent. …?” (read here ) I explained to him how Nigeria is UNlicensing its best (ASUU is on strike).

My Johns Hopkins University PhD work with the patent that came out of it has a major assignee: The United States Government via the National Science Foundation of the United States. I invented a special method of controlling the dexterity of medical robots, making such robots effective during minimally invasive surgeries.  This patent is currently used by some medical device companies.  The U.S. Government now has the rights to “make copies” as captured in the patent assignee file. Simply, it is now licensed to the United States Government which can use it in the National Science Foundation projects.

Let me thank all for the kind words. But note this: our future is of abundance. Believe in Africa!

Comment on LinkedIn Feed

Ndubuisi, you may not be the most educated or wealthiest (far from it) person in Nigeria, but you have created a new basis of competition, as you always say. Yes, it’s uncommon for a black man to share information or knowledge, without feeling ‘threatened’ about his own probable diminishing of self-worth. This I believe is your greatest impact so far, across Africa. You may not be able to measure the effects, but in years to come, when more men and women from this continent begin to share information, to help lift others; most of the credits could be directed to you.

With what you have demonstrated so far, I believe many people from this part of the world, who are well educated, well travelled, and some very wealthy, will begin to open up more, share knowledge and ideas; and from there – bring many young people closer to their potentialities and aspirations. That unlocking of the ‘secret boxes’ is what Nigeria and Africa need most, not really the writing fat cheques and handing them out to those who are still suffering identity crisis.

You have started a movement, knowingly or unknowingly, but it must surely outlive you. Yes, it’s possible to share knowledge without the sharer losing anything. Better days ahead!

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